Wildcard SSL Certificates

You can add sub-domains to your server and they will be covered by your Wildcard SSL Certificate automatically. You do not need to re-issue your Wildcard SSL Certificate each and every time when you add sub-domains to it. The newly added sub-domains will be automatically covered by your Wildcard SSL Certificate.

A Wildcard SSL Certificate is specifically created to allow users to secure one single domain name and all its sub-domains. With other words, you can secure one single domain name and an unlimited number of sub-domains belonging to that domain name with one single Wildcard SSL Certificate.

You can add sub-domains to your server and they will be covered by your Wildcard SSL Certificate automatically. You do not need to re-issue your Wildcard SSL Certificate each and every time when you add sub-domains to it. The newly added sub-domains will be automatically covered by your Wildcard SSL Certificate.

NOTE: The sub-domains that you can secure with one Wildcard SSL Certificate have to be either 1st level sub-domains (e.g.: *.example.com) or 2nd level sub-domains (*.mob.example.com). You cannot secure 1st and 2nd level sub-domains with one regular Wildcard SSL Certificate.  If you want to secure 1st level sub-domains and 2nd level sub-domains, you have to get a Multi-Domain Wildcard SSL Certificate, or 2 separate Wildcard SSL Certificates.

For example, a regular Wildcard SSL Certificate allows you to secure:

  1. One main domain name (example.com) and all its 1st level sub-domains (*.example.com):
    1. my.example.com
    2. test.example.com
    3. dev.example.com
    4. mail.example.com
    5. (etc)
  2. Or, one sub-domain (mob.example.com) and all 2nd level sub-domains (*.mob.example.com):
    1. my.mob.example.com
    2. test.mob.example.com
    3. dev.mob.example.com
    4. mail.mob.example.com
    5. (etc)

In order to secure one domain and all its sub-domains as shown in the first example, you have to include *.example.com as a common name (domain name) when creating a CSR (Certificate Signing Request). If you want to secure 2nd level sub-domains, then you have to enter *.mob.example.com as a common name (domain name) when creating a CSR (Certificate Signing Request).

The sub-domains that you can secure with one Wildcard SSL Certificate have to be either 1st level sub-domains (e.g.: *.example.com) or 2nd level sub-domains (*.mob.example.com). You cannot secure 1st and 2nd level sub-domains with one regular Wildcard SSL Certificate.

If you want to secure 1st level sub-domains and 2nd level sub-domains, you have to get a Multi-Domain Wildcard SSL Certificate, or 2 separate Wildcard SSL Certificates.

For example, a regular Wildcard SSL Certificate allows you to secure:

  1. One main domain name (example.com) and all its 1st level sub-domains (*.example.com):
    1. my.example.com
    2. test.example.com
    3. dev.example.com
    4. mail.example.com
    5. (etc)
  2. Or, one sub-domain (mob.example.com) and all 2nd level sub-domains (*.mob.example.com):
    1. my.mob.example.com
    2. test.mob.example.com
    3. dev.mob.example.com
    4. mail.mob.example.com
    5. (etc)

In order to secure one domain and all its sub-domains as shown in the first example, you have to include *.example.com as a common name (domain name) when creating a CSR (Certificate Signing Request). If you want to secure 2nd level sub-domains, then you have to enter *.mob.example.com as a common name (domain name) when creating a CSR (Certificate Signing Request).

A Multi-Domain Wildcard SSL Certificate is specifically created to allow users to secure multiple domains and sub-domains using one single SSL Certificate.

NOTE #1: Any Multi-Domain Wildcard SSL Certificate should start with a non-Wildcard domain. This means that anytime you configure and request a Multi-Domain Wildcard SSL Certificate, you need to generate a CSR (Certificate Signing Request) for a single domain (such as: example.com), without any asterisk sign “*”. This is a requirement that comes from the Certificate Authorities. All the additional SANs (2nd, 3rd, 4th domains) can be Wildcard domains.

For example, a Multi-Domain Wildcard SSL Certificate that has 4 SAN (domains) by default, allows you to secure the following:

  1. One main domain and multiple Wildcard domains:
    1. example.com – included in the CSR (Certificate Signing Request)
    2. *.example.com
    3. *.mysite.com
    4. *.abcxyz.com
  2. One main domain and multiple Wildcard domains (with both, 1st level and 2nd level sub-domains):
    1. example.com – included in the CSR (Certificate Signing Request)
    2. *.example.com
    3. *.mob.example.com
    4. *.mysite.com
  3. Several domains and multiple Wildcard domains (with both, 1st level and 2nd level sub-domains):
    1. example.com – included in the CSR (Certificate Signing Request)
    2. *.example.com
    3. mysite.com
    4. *.mob.mysite.com

NOTE #2: If you add a SAN item like *.domain.com, you will protect its unlimited sub-domains but not the main domain. For example, if you want to secure secure two domains and all their sub-domains, you have to configure your SSL in the following format:

  1. domain.com – included in the CSR (Certificate Signing Request)
  2. *.domain.com
  3. mysite.com
  4. *.mysite.com

You can add sub-domains to your server and they will be covered by your Wildcard SSL Certificate automatically. You do not need to re-issue your Wildcard SSL Certificate each and every time when you add sub-domains to it. The newly added sub-domains will be automatically covered by your Wildcard SSL Certificate.

 

Unfortunately, there are no Wildcard EV SSL Certificates on the market. The Certificate Authorities refuse to issue EV Wildcard SSL Certificates because of the security reasons, so as they want to have complete control over the subdomains that they issue an EV SSL to. That is why, your only solution is to buy a Multi-Domain EV SSL Certificate that secures multiple domains and subdomains.